Ten Strategies To Prevent Bullying In School

According to the National Youth Violence Prevention Center, one out of three students has either been the victim of bullying or acted as a bully, and each day 160,000 children miss school due to a fear of being bullied. Nationally, over five million students are affected by bullying while in school – something that has been shown to harm self-esteem, stall learning, and even lead to serious physical and emotional harm.

 

While some mistakenly believe that bullying is simply a natural occurrence, there are multiple strategies that teachers, parents and students can use in concert in order to minimize and control bullying in schools. Here are ten ways that have been proven to prevent bullying:

 

  1. Increase adult supervision. In the majority of cases, bullying takes place when there are no adults to witness it. It follows that one of the most effective ways to prevent bullying is to increase adult supervision on the playground, in the hallways, and in the lunchroom – places where bullying is most likely to occur during the school day.

  2. Increase awareness of bullying. Even if your school cannot budget for increased adult supervision, you can increase adult and student awareness of bullying. Since bullying often takes place at school but away from authority figures, educating students to stand up for their peers is key to stopping the problem.

  3. Make a school-wide effort. Studies have shown that bully prevention is less effective when individual bullies are targeted or singled out. Instead, whole school approaches that involve those who are bullied, the bullies themselves and those who are not involved in bullying are the most successful.

  4. Establish a clear policy for bullying. Create school rules that specifically address bullying and have specific consequences for offenders. Be sure that students can anonymously report bullying and be sure that both students and teachers are familiar with the specifics of the school’s anti-bullying policy.

  5. Consistently enforce bully policies. Equally important to creating a working bully policy in your school is enforcing that policy consistently.

  6. Empower bullied students. While it is important to discipline and educate bullies, it is equally important to empower and educate those who are bullied. Bullied children often feel anxious, isolated, worthless, and fearful – emotions that ironically increase their chances of further bullying.

  7. Making certain that those who are bullied receive the support they need will not only keep them safe but also increase their self-esteem and allow them to correctly respond to future bullying.

  8. Involve parents. Make sure that all parents – not just the parents of bullies or the bullied – are aware of the signs of bullying, the consequences of bullying, and the correct responses to bullying.

  9. Don’t forget cyber-bullying. Many older adults think that bullying is limited to schoolyard fights or verbal exchanges, but in today’s world, children can also be harassed, emotionally abused and teased over the internet. Monitor school computer use and block potentially harmful sites, such as social networking sites.

  10. Enlist the silent majority. One of the most disturbing aspects of bullying is that it is often ignored or even accepted by the students who are not directly involved. By making all students aware of how damaging bullying can do and how bullying can affect the overall school culture – is very important to creating a bully-free environment and a compassionate and empathetic student body.

Project Appleseed, family engagement, parental involvement public schools

"A 10% increase in parental participation (a form of social capital) would increase academic achievement far more than a 10% increase in school spending."

Project Appleseed, family engagement, parental involvement public schools

This is not an argument against school budget increases, but an argument for paying attention to social capital (Putnam, Sanders 2001). Research repeatedly correlates family engagement with student achievement, yet this strategy is rarely activated as an integral part of school reform efforts (Weiss et al, 2010).  Our program can increase family engagement in your school community!

Project Appleseed's Parental Involvement Toolbox is ourl program designed for educators and parent leaders to supersize and mobilize family engagement.

You get unlimited membershio reproduction rights to our web site content for distribution in newsletters, memos, booklets, pamphlets and more for one year!*

Learn family engagement with our In-person or Online training!. Utilize one of America's most accessible parent and family engagement leaders in your schools!

Download our slideshow: Strong Families, Strong Schools! Family engagement should be an essential strategy in building partnership with parents.

Pledge

AS A PARENT, GRANDPARENT, OR CARING ADULT, I hereby give my pledge of commitment to help our community’s children ....

Toolbox

Project Appleseed's Parental Involvement Toolbox is ourl program designed for educators and parent leaders to supersize and mobilize family engagement.

Report Card

Project Appleseed provides this self-diagnostic tool which is intended to help parents rate their contributions to their child's success at school.

Membership

You get unlimited membership reproduction rights to our web site content for distribution in newsletters, memos, booklets, pamphlets and more for one year!*

Checklist

How well does your school reach out to parents. The following questions can help you evaluate how well your school is reaching out to parents.

Training

Learn family engagement with our In-person or Online training!. Utilize one of America's most accessible parent and family engagement leaders in your schools!

Events

For 25 years we have lead American education with two celebrated events – National Parental Involvement Day and Public School Volunteer Week

Slideshow

Download our slideshow: Strong Families, Strong Schools! Family engagement should be an essential strategy in building partnership with parents.