Retain And Improve Your Child’s

Reading Skills Over Summer Vacation

Here are eight tips on how to cultivate summer reading in your children while building lifelong reading skills and reading habits:  

 

1. Let your children choose the subject matter, if not the material itself. Your child will read more and build more reading skills if they are reading books and magazines that speak to their interests – and don’t forget that they are on vacation. You will find that there is quality writing about most any subject that interests children, and that your child will thank you for finding it. Look for biographies of sports greats for your athlete who doesn’t like to read. Look for novelizations of video games for your child who can’t stay away from his Xbox.

 

2. Plan an activity around a book. If your child is looking forward to a big summer movie release, have the family read the book the movie was based on. If you have already planned a vacation, pick a summer book that takes place in the geographical area where you are headed. If your child is taking swimming lessons, find reading material that supports and builds on her new pastime.

3. Pick a challenging summer book to read together. Your child is never too old to read to, and as they get older, family members can take turns with the book. Choosing a classic book to read with your child over the summer can bring you closer and serve as another example of reading for recreation.

 

4. Reading aloud to your children also gives you an opportunity to choose a slightly more challenging book than one they could read by themselves.  
 
5. Introduce a variety of reading materials. Don’t limit your children to books – fill your summer with reading the newspaper, magazines, comics, and essays. Seek out a few quality blogs or internet sites that are appropriate for your young reader. If you’re at a museum, read the informative plaques. If you’re at a restaurant, read the menu together. 
 
6. Visit your local library. Libraries are much more than a source of free books. Especially during the summer, libraries may have weekly activities, summer-long reading challenges, summer reading lists, and even youth book clubs. Library visits can also add structure to long summer days. 
 
7. Set a good example of a recreational reader. Teach reading by example. If you are enjoying a good book on the beach, or listen to a book on tape in the car, your child will associate reading with fun, relaxation, and leisure. Talk to your children about the books you are reading. 
 
8. Bring books along. Summer can be filled with an endless string of activities for the family – but those activities also include downtime. Tote a bag of books with you or keep a few in the car so that you can squeeze reading in even when you are on the go.

 

Written by Elliott Shostak

Project Appleseed, family engagement, parental involvement public schools

"A 10% increase in parental participation (a form of social capital) would increase academic achievement far more than a 10% increase in school spending."

Project Appleseed, family engagement, parental involvement public schools

This is not an argument against school budget increases, but an argument for paying attention to social capital (Putnam, Sanders 2001). Research repeatedly correlates family engagement with student achievement, yet this strategy is rarely activated as an integral part of school reform efforts (Weiss et al, 2010).  Our program can increase family engagement in your school community!

Project Appleseed's Parental Involvement Toolbox is ourl program designed for educators and parent leaders to supersize and mobilize family engagement.

You get unlimited membershio reproduction rights to our web site content for distribution in newsletters, memos, booklets, pamphlets and more for one year!*

Learn family engagement with our In-person or Online training!. Utilize one of America's most accessible parent and family engagement leaders in your schools!

Download our slideshow: Strong Families, Strong Schools! Family engagement should be an essential strategy in building partnership with parents.

Pledge

AS A PARENT, GRANDPARENT, OR CARING ADULT, I hereby give my pledge of commitment to help our community’s children ....

Toolbox

Project Appleseed's Parental Involvement Toolbox is ourl program designed for educators and parent leaders to supersize and mobilize family engagement.

Report Card

Project Appleseed provides this self-diagnostic tool which is intended to help parents rate their contributions to their child's success at school.

Membership

You get unlimited membership reproduction rights to our web site content for distribution in newsletters, memos, booklets, pamphlets and more for one year!*

Checklist

How well does your school reach out to parents. The following questions can help you evaluate how well your school is reaching out to parents.

Training

Learn family engagement with our In-person or Online training!. Utilize one of America's most accessible parent and family engagement leaders in your schools!

Events

For 25 years we have lead American education with two celebrated events – National Parental Involvement Day and Public School Volunteer Week

Slideshow

Download our slideshow: Strong Families, Strong Schools! Family engagement should be an essential strategy in building partnership with parents.