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Taking a multiple-choice test is a unique challenge. The answer is right in front of you on the page – but which one is it? While it is normal to become overwhelmed by the choices on these tests or to be confused by your options, there are several test-taking techniques that can help you find the answers, fill in the right bubbles and make the grade.

You’ve determined that your child need extra one-on-one attention from a tutor in one or more subjects – but you don’t know how to find or select a tutor selection process: you may not have had to find one before and you may think you lack the experience or knowledge to do so, but it can be done relatively easily.

The studies regarding single-sex classrooms in elementary schools often boast shockingly positive results: a 2008 Stetson University study in Florida found that teaching single-sex math classes in fourth grade increased proficiency scores on the FCAT by 27 percent for girls and 30 percent for boys.

Academic success is important, but what can a well-educated student accomplish if they do not have a strong character, good values, and laudable aspirations? While most parents and teachers know how to instruct a child to read or do long division, fewer people know how to best help their children become responsible citizens and positive contributors to society.

Looking back on your childhood, changes are that there was an adult or two who inspired you, advised you, comforted you, and helped you through hard times. Whether it was a parent, a coach, a teacher, or a relative, your mentor helped you grow, learn and mature through some of the toughest lessons of growing up. Unfortunately, while all children have the potential to contribute something special to society, many lack the guidance and support that a mentor could bring into their lives.

The advent of the internet over the last decade has opening up worlds of information and opportunity for people of all ages. But while the internet serves to open new doors of communication and learning, it is also an increasingly dangerous place for children. As younger children become more technologically savvy – sometimes more savvy than their parents – they can fall prey to internet predators, internet bullying and online scams.

A pet can be a loving, fun, and cherished addition to any household. In addition, a pet can also help a child learn how to be a more responsible member of the household and of the community at large. More specifically, a pet can help our child learn

What makes one student succeed in school while another student fails? Is it how smart they are? Is it how successful their parents are? Is it how hard they work? The answer is that there is no singular formula for what makes a successful student, but there are a number of choices that most successful students make that contribute to their school achievement. 

Most everything you know about your child’s teacher – and your child’s school day – comes from the mouth of your child. A parent/teacher conference is an excellent way to learn more about where your child spends most of his or her day and how they are succeeding in school. Additionally, a parent/teacher conference is an ideal time to form a strong connection with your child’s teacher that can last throughout the school year.

Parents can certainly push their children too hard or expect too much for their children, but educational researchers have found that the correct kinds of encouragement and expectations can lead to higher rates of student success.